Monthly Archives: January 2014

Dissecting a Windows malware Screenshot

Through a friend of my I got to this seemingly fresh malware named GoogleChromeUpdater.exe. The page (URL see at the end of the post) claims to distribute a important Chrome Update. However, the malware encrypt files and left an E-Mail address, the classic file kidnapping along with blackmailing.

Note: If you are infected by this malware your chances are bad to get back your data. The encryption key is likely only stored on the attackers server. Unless somebody breaks the encryption, you cannot restore your data. And of course, you should not feed criminals! 🙂

I could not resist and had to have a closer look at the malware…

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An introduction into the Tegra (boot) world

Tegra Logo

Tegra Logo

This blog post provides a big picture of the Linux Tegra OSS world. The Wikipedia article about Tegra serves well to get an overview of the Tegra SoC in general, especially from the hardware side.

Linux/Android software provided from NVidia for the Tegra processors are generally known as Linux for Tegra (L4T). Beside the Kernel and its sources, this includes proprietary driver binaries and utilities.

On the other side, today, open source projects such as Linux or U-Boot have a fairly well upstream support for Tegra too. Also thanks to the effort of NVidia providing open source code and documentation as well as pushing things upstream.

This article should provide a big picture about the boot process, available boot software and the state of upstream implementation. Its not a complete view of things, but it would have helped me learning about the Tegra world, so it might help others too :-).

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Adaptec 6805H single in a Linux server

In order to extend the amount of SATA disk in my server I decided to use the Adaptec 6805H single Host Bus Adapter (which converts from PCI-E bus to SAS/SATA bus :-)). The device uses a PMC PM80xx chipset. SAS is backward compatible to SATA, one can connect up to 4 devices on a SAS port on this device. The BIOS is not very fast, however my four SATA disks were recognized without any problem. Also, the Ubuntu 13.04 Linux Kernel detected the card with the PCI-ID 9005:8081 using the module pm80xx. Rebuilding of a RAID5 consisting of 4 WD Red 3TB disks went reasonable fast with approximately 130MB/sec. So far, I can recommend that controller for Linux users! Read more »

Install Crazyfly CFClient on Arch Linux (Bitcraze)

In order to run Crazyfly python client (CFClient) some prerequisite have to be installed.

# pacman -S python2 python2-pygame python2-pyqt4

Install libusb from AUR

# yaourt -S python2-pyusb

Also, if you want to get the sources directly from the repository, buy mercurial.

# pacman -S mercurial
$ hg clone
$ cd crazyflie-pc-client
$ python2 bin/cfclient